Teleneurology Provides Rapid Response from a Top Level Neurologist

Two weeks ago I had the pleasure of attending the Society of Interventional Radiologist CLOTS training course in Dallas TX. The course is staged as a comprehensive five-day training course is composed of in-depth multidisciplinary lectures emphasizing the entire spectrum of stroke diagnosis and management.

The conference was centered around the minimally invasive approach to advanced ischemic stroke intervention and all of the management considerations, along with this, there was a full suite training course on the various techniques and medical device technology-from imaging to the catheter based solutions to intervention.

There were many presentations at the meeting, presenting many findings from some of the luminary interventional programs in the U.S. and Europe.

Several presentations focused specifically on the overall process in which acute ischemic stroke is identified, triaged, processed, and managed on a systemic level.  This approach is generally considered a “Hub and Spoke” a model of developing a transfer pattern with in a defined geography where institutions that do not have in-house interventional capabilities can efficiently refer the appropriate cases to the “hub” for the advanced procedure that would not be able to be performed in-house at the originating site.  This model is particularly attractive to the interventional team as the number of in-house cases that present are generally not in sufficient numbers to fully support and justify the cost burden of a full swing interventional program.

SOC attended this course in order to bring attention to one of the key issues that hinders these programs from realizing their growth potential-Acute Emergency Neurological consultation in the ED.  All interventional programs depend on the neurology staff of any given institution to identify candidates for both IV lytics, medical management, and in most cases, those that would benefit from advanced intervention in a bi-plane suite.  Many community level hospitals do not have 24/7/365 neurology to cover ED stroke call.  Even those that do, do not have the ability to respond to stroke codes within the “window” that stroke cases require to capture the opportunity for either lytics administration or intervention.  Hence the emphasis on how to create a network of hospitals that can feed an interventional practice.  This window is often lost due to the response times from the local specialists.  The lytics window is up to 4.5 hours for IV, and 8-12 for endovascular therapy.  The SOC specialists are guaranteed to respond in 15 minutes or less, thereby shortening the time that is lost waiting for a specialist to give an opinion on the case.

Many Interventional programs lack the depth of call and expertise to provide such rapid response to neurological emergencies in the community setting.  With that said, many of the institutions that develop partnerships as “hub and spoke” lose momentum as the neurological consulting staff is not deep enough to provide 24/7/365 call coverage in a consistent and rapid fashion-burn out ensues and the network loses its effectiveness.  As a result, many of the partners lose confidence in calling for consultation and revert back to just sending all cases to the tertiary center.  This is neither good for the patient nor the receiving hospital, as the vast majority of cases are ones that can stay at the originating hospital and need not be transferred away from the community.  The receiving hospital is then using resources to manage patients that could have been kept at the partner site and not using the resources for advanced care.

SOC had Dr. Heather Linn present on the history of SOC, the methods and value that having the availability of rapid response from a top level neurologist.  She articulated to the audience how 15 minute response time, along with the correct information has allowed SOC doctors to deliver more front line acute stroke care than any other neurological practice in the U.S.  Because SOC physicians are all fellowship trained and also well versed on the available interventional treatments available in most tertiary centers, SOC is uniquely able to assist both hubs and partner hospitals in tending to the extremely time sensitive nature of acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes.  With that said, there was considerable interest from the interventional field in how SOC can partner in assisting the flow and triage of patients that are appropriate candidates for advanced neuroendovascular procedures.  The body of specialists I spoke to were blown away with the volume of cases that the SOC physician staff has responded to, on average over 10,000 a year.  Further, they were also impressed with the ability to appropriately manage and in many cases recommend treatment for these critically ill patients.

I very much enjoyed the presentations I attended and want to thank everyone that stopped by the booth and asked questions or for more information.  It is clear that there is high value in utilizing the SOC solution as a key component in an advanced neuro-rapid response outreach program.  I look forward to seeing more partnerships with SOC as an integral part of advanced Neuroscience initiatives.